mastersofthe80s:

RoboCop

cinephiliabeyond:

A 1982 roundtable discussion with David Cronenberg, John Carpenter, and John Landis.

Here we have a thoroughly engaging roundtable featuring John Carpenter, John Landis, and a very young David Cronenberg from 1982. The group was gathered to talk for half an hour about their careers in the horror genre. Cronenberg, especially, is no stranger to controversy, and he talks at length about the sexual and violent themes that permeate his early films (and would continue on through much of his later work). Some highlights — and there are many — include Landis admitting he spent a full week on the An American Werewolf In London transformation scene and Cronenberg discussing the upsetting sight of a 3-year old girl attending a screening of Shivers. Also notable is that this discussion was filmed before two major achievements/masterpieces — The Thing for Carpenter and Videodrome for Cronenberg — and there is a sort of unspeakable gratification in knowing that the best is yet to come. It is a rare thing to see such major creative minds at, arguably, the very pinnacle of their output. —The Seventh Art

Here’s six of the Horror world’s leading figures dine together. Hosted by Clive Barker  with guests John Carpenter, Roger Corman, Ramsey Campbell, Lisa Tuttle and Pete Atkins. Aired in 1990.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

kilofuckface:

What an excellent day for an exorcism

(Source: bellecs)

theeviluncle:

Audrey Tatou

theeviluncle:

Audrey Tatou

(Source: hey-my-sweetheart)

beautyandterrordance:

THE MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH:

“It is obviously Vincent Price’s vehicle, and he gives us one of his most focused and balanced performances. Scripts and directors so often pulled upon Price’s comedic aplomb… or his grave capacity for projecting utter malevolence. In this, he mixes both. He is utterly ruthless and toxically charismatic; thus, it’s easy to see why he has followers and why they humiliate themselves for his delight.”

From MONSTER SERIAL,
published by The Collinsport Historical Society
, via silverscreams.

cinephiliabeyond:

Some of the photos above are previously unseen black and white shots from filming of Pink Floyd: The Wall,  taken by the production’s stills photographer David Appleby, discovered in a store room at Pinewood Film Studios and put on show to celebrate the film’s 30th anniversary milestone.

Pink Floyd: The Wall was written almost entirely by Roger Waters, the band’s intellectual, self-analytical, sometimes tortured lead singer. Its central character, named Pink, is played by Bob Geldof, of all people, who could not be less like Pink. The credits say he is being “introduced.” He’s onscreen more than anyone else, goes through punishing scenes, and even sings at times, although this isn’t a performance film but essentially a 95-minute music video. Geldof morphs through several standard rock star looks, all familiar from other stars: The big-haired sex god, the attractive leading man, the haunted neurotic, the cadaverous drug victim. In his most agonizing scene, he shaves off all his body hair in a bloody reprise of Scorsese’s famous short “The Big Shave.” The best audience for this film would be one familiar with filmmaking techniques, alert to directorial styles, and familiar with Roger Waters and Pink Floyd. I can’t imagine a “rock fan” enjoying it very much on first viewing, although I know it has developed a cult following. It’s disquieting and depressing and very good. No one much enjoyed making it. I remember Alan Parker being somewhat quizzical at the time; I learn from Wikipedia that he fought with Waters and Scarfe and considered the film “one of the most miserable experiences of my creative life.” Waters’ own verdict: “I found it was so unremitting in its onslaught upon the senses, that it didn’t give me, anyway, as an audience, a chance to get involved with it.” —Roger Ebert

Here is your chance to download this historic Pink Floyd document: Roger Waters’s screenplay for Pink Floyd: The Wall, illustrated by Gerald Scarfe. You can also listen to an insightful LaserDisc commentary by director Alan Parker (NOTE: different/omitted from Columbia Music’s DVD).

The Other Side of The Wall  is a 25 minute documentary about the making of Pink Floyd: The Wall, originally aired on MTV in 1982. The documentary looks at the conception, design and live shows of The Wall performed by Pink Floyd in 1980 and 1981. It features in-depth 1980s era interviews with Roger Waters, David Gilmour, Richard Wright and Nick Mason and shows footage of The Wall performed at Earl’s Court in 1980. It also features archival footage of the Syd Barrett era Pink Floyd and discusses how David Gilmour was brought into the band to initially augment their live shows when Syd became unreliable due to his drug problem and how Gilmour ultimately replaced him. A short retrospective of Pink Floyd post-Syd in included. The documentary also discusses is how Roger Waters’ concept of The Wall came about and how Pink Floyd, the band, were on the verge of breaking up while performing The Wall concerts. Included are interviews with Mark Fisher (stage designer), Jonathan Park (stage designer), Gerald Scarfe (animation designer and director) and Bob Geldof and Alan Parker in relation to the making of Pink Floyd: The Wall.

Retrospective: Looking Back at the Wall  is a 45 minute documentary that provides some very interesting insights and recollections from the creators of the film. The DVD of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

nitratediva:

Alfred Hitchcock at Lincoln Center in 1974. Click on the gifs for larger versions.

(Source: whiteguykarate)

barefootmarley:

the lebowski series

bubble gun

randomaniacfilm:

The Shining1980

randomaniacfilm:

The Shining
1980

(Source: wonderwomanzombies)